MIMR Media

2013

 

December

Research to aid premature babies, Herald Sun, 25 December 2013

THE transition from foetus to a baby at the time of birth is the biggest challenge for the body in its lifetime, but little is understood about how it evolves at that critical time. More

Melbourne is centre of medical advances, Herald Sun, 25 December 2013

The fragile, underdeveloped lungs of premature babies may be repaired in the days after birth, with a stem-cell-like treatment earmarked for a Melbourne trial next year. Pioneered at Melbourne's Monash Institute of Medical Research, the treatment involves...More

A cholesterol discovery will lead to better drugs, Herald Sun, 11 December 2013

SCIENTISTS have discovered how so-called "good cholesterol" protects arteries, paving the way for new drugs to reduce the risk of heart disease and stroke. More

Also syndicated in news.com.au.

Creatine could help oxygen-starved babies emerge unscathed, Herald Sun, 9 December 2013

A BODYBUILDING supplement will be tested on pregnant women by Monash University researchers, who believe it can prevent brain damage and injury to babies' organs at the time of birth. More

Also syndicated in Courier Mail, Adelaide Advertiser, Daily Telegraph, news.com.au, Perth Now.

Our scientists on the cutting edge, Herald Sun, 8 January 2014

Treatment pioneered at Melbourne’s Monash Institute of Medical Research may help premature babies. More

Male fertility, 774 ABC Melbourne, 4 December

Professor David De Kretser comments on male fertility, and support for VCE students.

November

A father has raised $100,000 to fight deadly cancer in honour of daughter, Herald Sun, 23 November 2013.

A GRIEVING Australian ­father, who lost his young daughter to cancer, has set up a charity to fast-track medical research. More

Regular bed times as important for kids as getting enough sleep, The Conversation, 8 November 2013

We’ve long known that children need a certain amount of sleep: nine to 11 hours per night for older kids, and up to 14 hours in 24 for toddlers. More

Also syndicated in The Central Telegraph, Gympie Times, Lismore Northern Star, Queensland Times, Pro Bono Australia, Toowoomba Chronicle, Byron Coast Times, Fraser Coast Chronicle, Balina Mail, Central Queensland News, Whitsunday Times, Gladstone Observer, Ipswich Satellite, Warwick Daily News

October

Breathing new life into preterm baby research, Monash University, 9 October 2013

Monash University researchers have received a prestigious National Institutes of Health (NIH) project grant to find ways to improve outcomes for very preterm infants who struggle to take their first breaths. More

Also syndicated in Phys.org

September

Viewpoints: the promise and perils of three-parent IVF, The Conversation, 20 September 2013

Three-parent IVF is about allowing women who carry genetic diseases in their mitochondria to avoid passing them on to their children. More

Ectopic pregnancy treatment, The Project (Channel 10),10 September 2013

Melbourne scientists have found a new way to treat life-threatening ectopic pregnancy that avoids surgery.

Ectopic pregnancy treatment, Channel 10 News (Melbourne, Sydney, Brisbane and Adelaide), 10 September 2013

Scientists have brought a woman back from the brink of infertility.

Ectopic pregnancy treatment, Channel 7 News (Melbourne), 10 September 2013

Researchers hail new treatment for ectopic pregnancy. More

Ectopic pregnancy treatment, Channel 9 News (Melbourne and Sydney), 10 September 2013

Melbourne scientists have developed a world-first treatment for ectopic pregnancy. More

Ectopic pregnancy treatment, ABC News, 10 September 2013

Melbourne researchers say they've found an effective, non-surgical treatment for ectopic pregnancies. More

Ectopic pregnancy treatment, SBS World News Australia, 10 September 2013

Researchers in Melbourne say they have made a significant break-through in the treatment of ectopic pregnancy. More

Trial a step forward in ectopic pregnancy treatment, The Age, 10 September 2013

Melbourne researchers have discovered a drug treatment for ectopic pregnancies that avoids surgery and preserves a woman's chance of a future healthy pregnancy. More

Also syndicated in The Border Mail

New treatment for ectopic pregnancy, The Herald Sun, 10 September 2013

MELBOURNE woman Elizabeth Cacencu lost one of her fallopian tubes when she suffered an ectopic pregnancy. More

Also syndicated in The West Australian, Sky News, The Mercury and Cowra Community News

New drug treatment for ectopic pregnancy more effective, reduces need for surgery, News.com.au (Online), 10 September 2013

A Melbourne trial of drug treatments cured ectopic pregnancies 34 per cent faster. More

New treatment for ectopic pregnancy hailed, ABC The World Today radio broadcast, 10 September 2013

Medical researchers in Melbourne and Scotland are optimistic that they've come up with a better treatment for ectopic pregnancy. More

New and exciting treatment with A/Prof Terry Johns, 2SER FM Radio (Sydney), 11 September 2013

Scientists at the Monash Institute of Medical Research have discovered an exciting new treatment for women with ectopic pregnancies. More

New hope for treating ectopic pregnancies with drugs, not surgery, ABC (Online), 10 September 2013

Melbourne researchers have found a new way to treat life-threatening ectopic pregnancies, using a cancer treatment rather than surgery. More

Ectopic pregnancy drugs trialled, Science Alert (Australia and New Zealand), 10 September 2013

Monash Institute of Medical Research (MIMR) scientists have discovered a new treatment for women with an ectopic pregnancy. More

New treatment for ectopic pregnancy, The Medical Observer, 10 September 2013

MELBOURNE researchers have pioneered a combination medical treatment for ectopic pregnancy that helps avoid surgery and reduces the need to remove the fallopian tube. More

Gefitinib plus methotrexate: new treatment option for ectopic pregnancy, News Daily (Reauter's Health), 10 September 2013

New York (Reuter's Health) - The combination of gefitinib and methotrexate might be useful for treating ectopic pregnancy, a pilot study suggests. More

Also syndicated in The Doctor's Channel (Online).

Surgery-free treatment for ectopic pregnancy trialed, Monash University website, 10 September 2013

Monash Institute of Medical Research (MIMR) scientists have discovered a new treatment for women with an ectopic pregnancy. More

Lung cancer drug 'could help treat ectopic pregnancy', BBC News, 10 September 2013

A lung cancer drug could be given to women with ectopic pregnancies in a bid to help them avoid surgery. More

Lung Cancer Drug Could Aid Plight of Ectopic Pregnancy Patients, Science Daily, 10 September 2013

Women with ectopic pregnancies could be spared surgery if they are treated with a lung cancer drug, a study suggests. More

Also syndicated in Armenian Medical Network (Online).

Lung cancer drug could protect fertility after an ectopic pregnancy and cut the time it takes to cure the problem by a third, The Daily Mail (UK), 10 September 2013

Women who suffer an ectopic pregnancy could have their fertility saved by a lung cancer drug. More

Drug hope for ectopic pregnancies, The Herald (Scotland), 10 September 2013

Women with ectopic pregnancies could be spared fertility-damaging surgery if they are treated with a drug normally used for lung cancer. More

New hope for treating ectopic pregnancies with drugs, not surgery, Farming Ahead (Online), 10 September 2013

Melbourne researchers have found a new way to treat life-threatening ectopic pregnancies, using a cancer treatment rather than surgery. More

August

Breastfeeding improves IQ - now have we got your attention?, The Conversation, 1 August 2013

Research published in JAMA Pediatrics this week shows a causal relationship between breastfeeding and higher IQ by the time a child is seven years old. Put simply, longer breastfeeding appears to make for smarter children. More

Also syndicated to the Northern Daily Leader.

July

Identical babies an amazing one in two-million occurence, Herald Sun, 26 July 2013

Monash Women's director Professor Euan Wallace said this was the main medical challenge with identical triplets because the babies shared one placenta. More

A First In Front Line Immunity Research, Science Daily (Online), 23 July 2013

Monash University researchers have gained new insight into the early stages of our immune response, providing novel pathways to develop treatments for diseases from multiple sclerosis to cancer. More.

Also syndicated to News Medical, Red Orbit, Asian Scientist, Science Codex and Health Canal (Online).

Meet mama, papa and mama: how three-parent IVF works, The Conversation (Online), 3 July 2013

The UK government has announced its intention to draft proposals allowing carriers of mitochondrial disease to have babies using a controversial IVF...More

June

Queen’s Birthday honours: Mike Brady up there among Bayside award recipients, The Weekly Review, 11 June 2013

Mike Brady, of Up There Cazaly fame, has goalled in the Queen’s Birthday honours awards. More

Gabi Hollows AO lauds generous Aussies, News.com.au (Online), 21 June 2013

Dr Gabi Hollows has received many accolades in her life, but she says her biggest honour was to be married to pioneering eye doctor Fred Hollows and bear his children. More

May

Weight gain in pregnancy needs a keen eye, NZ Doctor (Online), 29 May 2013

Euan Wallace, director of the Richie Centre at Monash Institute of Medical Research in Melbourne, says health professionals have taken their eye off the ball in monitoring pregnancy weight gain. More

Creatine may help newborns following birth asphyxia, ABC RN's The Science Show, 11, 13 May 2013

Birth asphyxia can occur during the final hour of otherwise healthy pregnancies. More

Dummies can help protect babies from cot death by regulating their heart beats, Daily Mail (Online), 6 May 2013

Using a dummy could protect babies from cot death, according to new Australian research. More

Dummies may help baby's heart, ABC (Online), 6 May 2013

Newborn babies that use dummies may have better protection against cot death because it improves their cardiac control, Australian research shows. More.

Tame the flame: the facts on inflammation, Prevention magazine May 2013 issue

It sounds innocent enough but as medical experts explain, taming it could instantly reduce your risk of cancer, heart disease - and more. More

April

How Helicobacter pylori interacts with the stomach, ABC RN's The Science Show, 28, 29 April 2013

Helicobacter pylori is the infectious bacterium that causes stomach ulcers. It was identified by Australian scientists Barry Marshall and Robin Warren in 1982 and for this they were awarded the Nobel Prize. The bacterium is found in 50% of the population. 20% of these will develop ulcers. More

Snoring in children, ABC RN's The Science Show, 6, 8 April, 2013

Snoring is often ignored in children. But when associated with high blood pressure, it can pose a real threat to health with effects on school results and behaviour. Anna Vlahandonis describes her work monitoring children’s snoring, the long-term effects of snoring on children’s hearts and their response to treatment. More

Gene hope found for rare medical condition, News.com.au (online) 7 April 2013

VICTORIAN researchers have made a world-first medical discovery that could help people with a rare, but incredibly severe medical condition. More

Also published in The Herald Sun, The Daily Telegraph, News Hour 24 (online), Silobreaker (online)

March

Prestigious award for Monash researchers, Monash University website, 27 March 2013

A microbiologist and a materials engineer from Monash University are among the 22 researchers honoured by their peers with election to the prestigious and influential Australian Academy of Science (AAS). More

Boarding the research platform, Monash University website, 27 March 2013

The Monash Health Translation Precinct (MHTP) Medical Genomics Facility and the Monash Animal Research Platform (MARP) were the joint winners of the Outstanding Monash Technology Research Platform Award. More

Sexually Transmitted infections - protein link found, Virtual Medical Centre website (online), 21 March 2013

Monash Institute of Medical Research (MIMR) scientists have found a protein in the female reproductive tract that protects against sexually transmitted diseases (STIs). More

American academy honours MIMR Director, Monash University Medical Faculty website(online), 20 March 2013

MIMR’s Director Professor Bryan Williams was honoured with a Fellowship at the American Academy of Microbiology this year. More

American academy honours researcher, Monash University website (online), 20 March 2013

Director of the Monash Institute of Medical Research (MIMR), Professor Bryan Williams has been honoured with a Fellowship at the American Academy of Microbiology. More

Cerebral Palsy breakthrough gives new hope, Sunday Herald Sun, 17 March 2013

CORD blood could be pumped back into newborns starved of oxygen during traumatic births to save them from brain injuries. More

Cerebral Palsy breakthrough gives new hope,  News.Com (online), 17 March 2013

CORD blood could be pumped back into newborns starved of oxygen during traumatic births to save them from brain injuries. More

Cerebral Palsy breakthrough gives new hope, Adelaide Now (online) 17 March 2013

CORD blood could be pumped back into newborns starved of oxygen during traumatic births to save them from brain injuries. More

Cerebral Palsy breakthrough gives new hope, The Courier Mail (online) 17 March 2013

CORD blood could be pumped back into newborns starved of oxygen during traumatic births to save them from brain injuries. More

Also published in ]News Whip (online), and Mina Saksham's blog.

A better start for pre-term babies, ABC RN's The Science Show, 16 March 2013

In 2009 medical graduate Rob Galinksy toured a large neo-natal intensive care unit in Melbourne. He describes how this inspired him to pursue a PhD in the newborn, with emphasis on the development and function of the cardiovascular system. His hope is that targeted therapies will be developed, alleviating the suffering of the pre-term babies, who too often go on to live with a range of debilitating conditions. More

World's best at research, Sunday Herald Sun (Editorial), 2 March 2013

WORLD-first research. Ground-breaking discovery. Life-saving innovation. The phrases roll off our tongues so often to describe developments that routinely flow from Melbourne's marvellous medical institutions, it's easy to take the astonishing achievements for granted. More

Breakthrough research gives premature babies hope, The Australian, 2 March 2013

EXCLUSIVE: THE damaged lungs of premature babies could be repaired in the days after their birth using a stem-cell-like treatment pioneered at Melbourne's Monash Institute of Medical Research. More

Breakthrough research gives premature babies hope, News.com BBC(online) 2 March 2013

EXCLUSIVE: THE damaged lungs of premature babies could be repaired in the days after their birth using a stem-cell-like treatment pioneered at Melbourne's Monash Institute of Medical Research. More

Breakthrough research gives premature babies hope, The Sunday Herald Sun, 2 March 2013

EXCLUSIVE: THE damaged lungs of premature babies could be repaired in the days after their birth using a stem-cell-like treatment pioneered at Melbourne's Monash Institute of Medical Research. More

Breakthrough research gives premature babies hope, The Courier Mail (online), 2 March 2013

EXCLUSIVE: THE damaged lungs of premature babies could be repaired in the days after their birth using a stem-cell-like treatment pioneered at Melbourne's Monash Institute of Medical Research. More

Progesterone-Only Mini Pill increases Chlamydia Chances, Top News (online) 1 March 2013

According to a study published in Science, it has been revealed that progesterone-only mini pill is increasing the chances for women for contracting Chlamydia. The pill is commonly used in Australia, but it is now that the pill has been said to be making women vulnerable to Chlamydia, a sexually transmitted disease. More

First natural protein that protects women from STDs discovered (Video), Examiner.com (online), 1 March 2013

Professor Paul Hertzog, Director of the Monash Institute of Medical Research Centre for Innate Immunity and Infectious Diseases, and his team announced their discovery of a naturally occurring female protein that protects women from some sexually transmitted diseases in the Feb. 28, 2013, issue of the journal Science. More

Mini pill may increase chlamydia risk, ABC Science (Online), 1 March 2013

The progesterone-only mini pill may increase a woman's chances of contracting chlamydia, Australian researchers say. More

Protein may protect against STIs, Science Alert (Aust &NZ) 1 March 2013

Monash Institute of Medical Research (MIMR) scientists have found a protein in the female reproductive tract that protects against sexually transmitted diseases (STIs) such as chlamydia and herpes simplex virus (HSV). More

Natural STD Protection for Women?, The Scientist, 1 March 2013

An interferon found in the female reproductive tract may help guard against sexually transmitted diseases such as herpes. More

Study finds protein link to sexually transmitted disease susceptibility, Medical Xpress.com, 1 March 2013

Monash Institute of Medical Research scientists have found a protein in the female reproductive tract that protects against sexually transmitted diseases (STIs) such as chlamydia and herpes simplex virus (HSV). More

Newcastle researchers help in the fight against STDs, Health Canal, 1 March 2013

Newcastle researchers have contributed to the discovery of a protein in the female reproductive tract that protects against sexually transmitted diseases (STDs) such as chlamydia and herpes simplex virus (HSV).

An estimated 450 million people worldwide are newly infected with STDs each year. Chlamydia has the highest infection rate of all the sexually transmitted infections (STIs) reported in Australia.

The research, published today in the prestigious journal Science, was led by Professor Paul Hertzog at the Monash Institute of Medical Research (MIMR) in collaboration with the University of Newcastle’s Professor Phil Hansbro* and his team, including Jay Horvat and Jemma Mayall. More

Protein protects from STDs, Newcastle Herald, 1 March 2013.

NEWCASTLE researchers have contributed to the discovery of a protein in the female reproductive tract that protects against sexually transmitted diseases such as chlamydia and herpes simplex.

An estimated 450million people worldwide are newly infected with sexually transmitted diseases every year. Chlamydia has the highest infection rate of all sexually transmitted infections reported in Australia.

The research, published today in the journal Science involved University of Newcastle researchers Professor Phil Hansbro, Jay Horvat and Jemma Mayall, who collaborated with colleagues from the Monash Institute of Medical Research. More

February

Seniors not retiring from bedroom, says Ita, Sydney Morning Herald, 25 February 2013.

CONTRARY to popular belief, sex was not invented by the young. More

Also syndicated to Brisbane Times.

January

Academic and biotechnology industry alliance wins $300,000 grant, BioMelbourne Network (online), 17 January 2013

The Victorian government has provided $300,000 to the Victorian Infection and Immunity Network (VIIN) as part of its Collaborative Networks Pilot Program, to encourage the development of partnerships between academic and industry groups and to accelerate industry’s adoption of new technologies. More

Academic and industry alliance wins grant, Monash University (website), 15 January 2013

The Victorian government has provided $300,000 to the Victorian Infection and Immunity Network (VIIN) as part of its Collaborative Networks Pilot Program, to encourage the development of partnerships between academic and industry groups and to accelerate industry’s adoption of new technologies. More

2012

December

The proteins which regulate obesity, ABC RN The Science Show, 1 December, replayed 3 December 2012

Australians have a greater chance of dying from heart disease than from a car accident. An important risk factor is obesity. Sixty per cent of Australian adults are overweight or obese and lifestyle is an important contributing factor. Agi Pindel describes her work investigating the role of particular proteins in regulating obesity and metabolic disorders in responses to excess energy consumption and reduced physical activity. More

November

Premmie babies: our tiny problem, growing bigger, Crikey.com, 30 November 2012

There's an international awareness day for just about everything these days, so it's not surprising that World Prematurity Day came and went on November 17 without anyone noticing. More

Golf day honours Evans, Waverley Leader, 27 November 2012

An annual golf day in memory of football identity Ron Evans has raised more than $652,000 for medical research, while remembering a mate. More

Monash Institute of Medical Research official launch for Cancer Genomic Medicine, Website: State Member of Parliament for Waverley, Michael Gidley, 19 November 2012.

Co-located in Clayton, within the Monash Health Translation Precinct, the Monash Institute of Medical Research is one of the country’s leading centres for hormone, reproductive health and cancer research. More

October

Snoring in Infancy Leads to Learning and Behavioral Problems, Parent Herald (Online), 2 October 2012

Snoring at an early age is a sign of impending problems in behavior and learning, researchers reveal. More

Combining genetics and computers to develop new-era medicines, The Science Show, ABC RN, 16 October 2012

Sam Forster describes his PhD work, attempting to understand the cellular response to interferon. Interferon is a key signalling molecule allowing cells to warn neighbouring cells that danger is present. This approach is seen as the start of a new era in medical research. More

Cancer-boosting protein identified, Monash Memo (Online), 24 October 2012

Published in the prestigious journal Cancer Cell, a study led by researchers from the Centre for Innate Immunity and Infectious Diseases at Monash Institute of Medical Research (MIMR) has discovered the role of a protein, Toll-Like Receptor 2 (TLR2), in promoting the growth of stomach (aka gastric) cancer, paving the way for future treatments. More

New next-gen cancer genomic centre at Melbourne’s Monash University, Invest Victoria (online), 18 October 2012

A new centre for cancer research which will shape the future of cancer detection and treatment has been opened at Monash University’s Clayton campus south-east of Melbourne’s city centre. More

Scientists discover a way to block tumour-spreading gene, Business Standard (India), 16 October 2012

Australian researchers have discovered that a gene which prompts growth of tumours in about a quarter of stomach cancer cases can be blocked by antibodies. More

Scientists may soon prevent growth and spread of stomach cancer, ABC Radio: PM, 16 October 2012

Stomach cancer is one of the world's deadliest cancers, causing hundreds and thousands of deaths each year. Scientists in Melbourne may have discovered a way of preventing the disease from growing and spreading. More

Scientists block stomach cancer growth, Medical Express (online), 16 October 2012

Stomach cancer is the second most lethal cancer in the world and is extremely aggressive. The discovery of the TLR2 gene's involvement in promoting tumour growth could lead to early detection options and potential new treatments. More

Antibody stops stomach cancer spread, Science Alert (Australia and New Zealand), 16 October 2012

Monash Institute of Medical Research scientists may have discovered a way of blocking stomach tumours from growing and spreading, according to a paper published in the highly-prestigious journal Cancer Cell, which is ranked in the top five science and medical research journals in the world, including Nature, Cell and Science. More

One cancer gene meets its match, Brisbane Times, 16 October 2012

MELBOURNE researchers may have found a way to block a gene that fuels the growth of tumours in about a quarter of stomach cancer cases, paving the way for a new treatment for one of the world's deadliest cancers. More

One cancer gene meets its match, Sydney Morning Herald 16 October 2012

MELBOURNE researchers may have found a way to block a gene that fuels the growth of tumours in about a quarter of stomach cancer cases, paving the way for a new treatment for one of the world's deadliest cancers. More

One cancer gene meets its match, The Age, 16 October 2012

MELBOURNE researchers may have found a way to block a gene that fuels the growth of tumours in about a quarter of stomach cancer cases, paving the way for a new treatment for one of the world's deadliest cancers. More

MIMR scientists block stomach tumour growth: Cancer Cell, Monash University: Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences, 16 October 2012

Monash Institute of Medical Research scientists may have discovered a way of blocking stomach tumours from growing and spreading, according to a paper published today in the highly-prestigious journal Cancer Cell, which is ranked in the top five science and medical research journals in the world, including Nature, Cell and Science. More

Also syndicated on:

All Voices, Daily Liberal (Dubbo), The Border Mail (Albury Wodonga), Northern Daily Leader (Tamworth), Port Macquarie News, Mandurah MailCowra GuardianPenrith City StarMusswellbrook ChronicleLakes MailThe Advertiser (Cessnock)The IrrigatorBlayney ChronicleDungog ChronicleMurray Bridge NewsParkes Champion Post,

New Research Centre Aims to give Stiff Fight to Cancer

Regional Australia Minister Simon Crean inaugurated the Australian Cancer Research Foundation Centre for Cancer Genomic Medicine. The centre is said to hold quite an importance when it comes to give a stiff fight against cancer. More

Clayton centre to help fight cancer, Monash Oakleigh Leader, 16 October 2012

The Australian Cancer Research Foundation Centre for Cancer Genomic Medicine was officially opened yesterday by Regional Australia Minister Simon Crean. More

Snoring Disrupts Learning Process, Affects Behavior in Children, Medical Daily, 12 October 2012

Two new studies from Australia say that snoring can be bad for children as it disrupts sleep and affects learning and behavior. More

Snoring link to infant learning problems, Herald Sun, 12 October, 2012

SNORING infants and children are more likely to experience learning and behavioural problems, Australian research shows. More

Snoring link to infant learning problems, The Australian, 12 October, 2012

SNORING infants and children are more likely to experience learning and behavioural problems, Australian research shows. More

Nobel prize winners prove that success can be cloned, The Conversation, 10 October, 2012

The 2012 Nobel Prize for Medicine and Physiology has been awarded to John Gurdon and Shinya Yamanaka, “for the discovery that mature cells can be reprogrammed to become pluripotent”. More

September

Studying young children who snore, The Science Show - ABC Radio National, 24 September, 2012

Up to 35% of children snore. It causes high blood pressure which contributes to cardio vascular disease. Lauren Nisbet is studying children between the ages of 3 and 5. They do a sleep over, in a sleep lab where heart rates and blood pressure are measured. Lauren Nisbet says preschool might be a time when snoring can be treated, thus reducing the consequences of snoring evident in older children. More

Tracking tiny engines in cells, Waverley Leader, 11 September 2012.

Dr Matthew McKenzie is trying to help your body by researching the tiny mitochondria that live in cells. More

Explainer: what is pelvic organ prolapse? The Conversation, 11 September 2012

Millions of Australian women experience a pelvic organ prolapse, but they suffer in silence. This hidden epidemic is a well-kept secret and few people in the rest of the community know anything about the condition. More

Study shows stillbirth risk for South Asian-born mothers, ABC Radio Australia, 3 September 2012.

A new study has found that women born in South Asia have more than double the risk of stillbirth late in pregnancy, compared with women born in Australia. The study, published in the Medical Journal of Australia, looked at more than 40,000 births at three public hospitals in the Australian city of Melbourne. More

More stillbirths among South Asian women, The Australian, 3 September 2012

WOMEN born in South Asian countries including India and Pakistan who give birth in Australia have almost double the rate of stillbirths compared to locally-born women, research shows. More

Risk of stillbirth double for some, The Age, 3 September 2012.

WOMEN born in India and Sri Lanka have more than double the risk of a stillbirth in late pregnancy, new research has shown, prompting calls for them to be more closely monitored and, in some cases, induced earlier to give birth to healthy babies. Researchers from Monash Medical Centre analysed data from more than 44,000 births between 2001 and 2011 after an intern observed that a high number of Indian women seemed to have stillbirths. More

Risk of stillbirth double for some, Sydney Morning Herald, 3 September 2012

WOMEN born in India and Sri Lanka have more than double the risk of a stillbirth in late pregnancy, new research has shown, prompting calls for them to be more closely monitored and, in some cases, induced earlier to give birth to healthy babies. More

 

Risk of stillbirth double for some, The Queenbeyan Age, 3 September 2012

WOMEN born in India and Sri Lanka have more than double the risk of a stillbirth in late pregnancy, new research has shown, prompting calls for them to be more closely monitored and, in some cases, induced earlier to give birth to healthy babies. More

 

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August

Baby Jack, 60 Minutes, 19 August 2012

It's a tragedy that can strike any one of us - a friend, a neighbour, even an Olympic champion. A little over a year ago, swimmer Brooke Hanson gave birth to her second son - Jack Hanson Clarke. It should have been an event to rival anything Brooke had achieved in the pool. But her little boy arrived in the world far too early. Unimaginably tiny, weighing just 663 grams and about as long as a school ruler, Jack bravely clung onto life for nine desperate months. On 60 Minutes, for the first time Brooke and her husband, Jared, talk about their very private loss and share what their dearly loved son taught them about courage and life. More

The Science Show, ABC Radio National, 18 August 2012

In Australia five hundred babies are born with asphyxia each year. One million babies are born with this condition yearly around the world. Asphyxia is a lack of oxygen at birth and can lead to permanent brain injury, epilepsy and cerebral palsy. As part of his PhD research, James Aridas describes his work using melatonin as a treatment for babies born with this condition. More

Women discuss sensitive issue, Melbourne Leader, 14 August 2012

A city forum next month will discuss a topic very few females enjoy talking about. More

More open on disorder, Monash Leader, 7 August 2012

It's an issue that will affect a quarter of Australian women at some stage in their life but no one is willing to talk about it. More

An Innate Immune Pathway Regulates Breast Cancer Metastasis, Cancer Discovery News, 3 August 2012

Escape from immunosurveillance mechanisms that recognize and eliminate malignant cells is an important step in tumor growth and progression. More

July

The Devil's technology, Australian Science, 27 July 2012

Biotechnology is rarely considered to be good for the environment. In fact, environmental campaigners frequently claim that genetically modified organisms represent a major threat to biodiversity and ecosystems. However, the study of the Tasmanian Devil Facial Tumour disease (DFTD) using genetic technologies is an example where biotechnology has been used to create a definite environmental benefit. More

MIMR and Peter Mac unmask breast cancer to block tumour spread, Monash University Website, 24 July 2012

Researchers at Monash Institute of Medical Research and the Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre in Melbourne have discovered an immune signal in breast cancer cells that regulates their spread to bone. This new process could be targeted with an existing treatment to complement currently therapy and wipe out cancerous cells that have spread to the bone. More

New hope for breast cancer: researchers unlock the key to the spread of breast cancer, The Science Bulletin, 24 July 2012

Breast cancer is the most common cancer among Australian women, with 38 women being diagnosed with the disease in Australia every day, according toCancer Care. Beyond this, a key concern for these patients is the possibility that the cancer cells could spread and thrive in other areas. More

Researchers unlock key to spread of breast cancer, 7 News (Yahoo 7), 23 July 2012

Melbourne scientists say they have discovered a way to stop breast cancer from spreading to the bone. Watch video

Dr Belinda finds a cancer answer, The Border Mail, 24 July, 2012

A FORMER Wodonga student is leading a team of Melbourne researchers whose discovery could stop breast cancer cells turning deadly in the patient’s bones. More

A New Solution to Restrict the Spread of Breast Cancer, Top News (USA), 23 July 2012

As discovered by researchers at the Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre and Monash Institute of Medical Research, once breast cancer attacks a woman, it restricts her immunity system to fight against several other diseases and illnesses. More

Breast Cancer Patients can Get a New Treatment Soon, Top News (NZ), 23 July 2012

If Melbourne scientists are to be believed then there is very good news for breast cancer patients and their sufferings. More

How breast cancer cells damage bones, The Times of India, 23 July 2012

Victorian scientists have found that some breast cancer cells can turn off a signal that causes the immune system to attack them. More

Breast cancer discovery aims to block tumour spread, ABC The World Today, 23 July 2012

The researchers at the Monash Institute of Medical Research and Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre say the disease spreads secretly by switching off the immune system and hiding in the blood stream. More

Bone breakthrough could help stop disease, Herald Sun (News.com.au), 23 July 2012

A medical discovery by Victorian scientists could stop breast cancer from spreading to the bones and becoming deadly. More

Researchers unlock key to spread of breast cancer, ABC Online, 23 July 2012

Melbourne scientists say they have discovered a way to stop breast cancer from spreading to the bone. More

Silencing of Irf7 pathways in breast cancer cells promotes bone metastasis through immune escape, Nature Medicine, 23 July 2012

Breast cancer metastasis is a key determinant of long-term patient survival. By comparing the transcriptomes of primary and metastatic tumor cells in a mouse model of spontaneous bone metastasis, we found that a substantial number of genes suppressed in bone metastases are targets of the interferon regulatory factor Irf7. More

June

"Three-parent IVF" could solve heartbreak, The Saturday Age, 23 June 2012

MONASH University scientists are developing a new fertility treatment that would use genetic material from three people in a bid to prevent women with a type of genetic disease passing it on to their children. More

Three-parent IVF' could solve heartbreak, All Voices (London UK), 23 June 2012

Louise Blair's baby Elisabeth died aged 11 months from mitochondrial disease. She hopes a new type of IVF could help prevent women passing on the disease to their children in future. University scientists are developing a new fertility treatment that would use genetic. More

Three-parent IVF’ could solve heartbreak, HIMAA Victoria Website, 23 June 2012

MONASH University scientists are developing a new fertility treatment that would use genetic material from three people in a bid to prevent women with a type of genetic disease passing it on to their children. More

Three-parent IVF’ could solve heartbreak, One News, 23 June 2012

MONASH University scientists are developing a new fertility treatment that would use genetic material from three people in a bid to prevent women with a type of genetic disease passing it on to their children. More

Three-parent IVF’ could solve heartbreak, Wot News, 23 June 2012

Monash University scientists are developing a new fertility treatment that would use genetic material from three people in a bid to prevent women with a type of genetic disease passing... More

Three-parent IVF’ could solve heartbreak, Witty Sparks, 23 June 2012

Louise Blair's baby Elisabeth died aged 11 months from mitochondrial disease. She hopes a new type of IVF could help prevent women passing on the disease to their children in future. Photo: Brian Cassey MONASH University scientists are developing a new... More

May

Umbilical cord tissue frozen in Australian first, Yahoo 7, 18 May 2012

In an Australian first, parents can now freeze their baby’s umbilical cord tissue to be used in treatments later in life. Scientists at Monash Institute of Medical Research believe stem cells found in cord tissue could one day be used to treat diseases such as diabetes, heart disease and Parkinsons. More

Test tube cubs in catfight for life, Monash Magazine, 18 May 2012

Test tube cubs have emerged as a new hope to halt the slide towards extinction of the snow leopard, Bengal tiger and other endangered big cats driven from their natural habitats. More

Viewing the lungs in 4D, Monash University News, 2 May 2012

A new lung imaging method has the potential to revolutionise the study of lungs in both normal and diseased states. More

April

Breakthrough treatment raises hopes of fighting cerebral palsy in the womb, The Age, 4 April 2012

Melbourne doctors may have found a way to prevent unborn babies from developing cerebral palsy, in a breakthrough that could protect the brains of hundreds of Australian cildren born with the condition each year. More